Agile Classrooms, Sociocratic Learning Labs!

 

I recently enjoyed an inspiring conversation with John Miller of Agile Classrooms where we explored the topic of agile in learning environments and specifically, agile adoption into the classroom.

 

John, an Agile Coach based in CCCCC began introducing agile principles and practices into schools in 2009. John believed that Agile could play a key role in empowering young people and enriching their learning experience through giving them a sense of ownership and therefore accountability for their learning journey. Since then interest in John’s work has grown considerably and more recently he crowd funded in order to focus even more time into this potential laden area of development.

 

During the call we also spoke about Sociocracy 3.0 and the role it can play in supporting agile practices to be adopted into larger systems. We looked at how agile is great at getting products, and learning for the kids, out of the door, and where agile reaches operating limits in the absence of suitable governance processes that facilitate effective collaboration across larger systems.

 

John’s main focus today is working with kids to create environments that support them in flourishing and exploring their potential in meaningful and practical ways. As John shared following a recent programme, “I went there to teach them something and then realised I could actually sit back and let them get on with it. I learned so much from them”!

 

I’m reaching out to connect with John and others working in the learning, education and schooling sector as certainly this represents one area where disruptive social technologies can play a big role in facilitating positive social transformation. In my experience, kids possess the inherent intelligence (latent wisdom even) needed to evolve more humane, fair and respectful ways of cooperating together, it’s often just dormant from lack of invitation to blossom, and lack of example in the world around them.

 

Having spent 10 years working in the area of holistic education with young people, I see the potential for agile and S3 principles, patterns and practices to support children and young people in discovering their voice, empowering themselves and developing artfulness in navigating decision making and working together.

 

Through choosing to engage with and applying agile practices into their learning environments, kids are empowered to take ownership of their learning journey.

 

If we want to see the generation of tomorrow growing in healthy ways and beyond the limitations of co-dependency – in many cases, learned helplessness and perpetual infantilism - then we might do well to support the evolution of less educative and more facilitative learning environments. Co-creating environments that empower children and young people to take ownership of their learning journey, leads to more healthy individuation and towards a positive appreciation for the benefits of acknowledging interdependency and collaborating and cooperating together.

 

If you’d like to discover more about John’s work then you can go to his site at www.agileclassrooms.com

 

If you’d like to discover more about Sociocracy 3.0 then you can check out the site at www.sociocracy30.org

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